What in the World Is a Worldview?

This is the first post in a 5-part series by Dr. James N. Anderson, associate professor of theology and philosophy at Reformed Theological Seminary. He is the author of What’s Your Worldview?: An Interactive Approach to Life’s Big Questions.


What’s a Worldview?

There has been much talk in recent years about worldviews. But what exactly is a worldview?

As the word itself suggests, a worldview is an overall view of the world. It’s not a physical view of the world, like the sight of planet Earth you might get from an orbiting space station. Rather, it’s a philosophical view of the world—and not just of our planet, but of all of reality. A worldview is an all-encompassing perspective on everything that exists and matters to us.

Your worldview represents your most fundamental beliefs and assumptions about the universe you inhabit. It reflects how you would answer all the “big questions” of human existence, the fundamental questions we ask about life, the universe, and everything.

Is there a God? If so, what is God like and how do I relate to God? If there isn’t a God, does it matter? What is truth and can anyone really know the truth anyway? Where did the universe come from and where is it going—if anywhere? What’s the meaning of life? Does my life have a purpose—and, if so, what is it? What am I supposed to do with my life? What does it mean to live a good life? Does it really matter in the end whether or not I live a good life? Is there life after death? Are humans basically just smart apes with superior hygiene and fashion sense—or is there more to us than that?

You get the idea. Your worldview directly influences how you answer those kinds of big questions—or how you would answer them if you were asked and gave them some thought.

Like Belly Buttons

Worldviews are like belly buttons. Everyone has one, but we don’t talk about them very often.  Or perhaps it would be better to say that worldviews are like cerebellums: everyone has one and we can’t live without them, but not everyone knows that he has one.

A worldview is as indispensable for thinking as an atmosphere is for breathing. You can’t think in an intellectual vacuum any more than you can breathe without a physical atmosphere. Most of the time, you take the atmosphere around you for granted: you look through it rather than at it, even though you know it’s always there. Much the same goes for your worldview: normally you look through it rather than directly at it. It’s essential, but it usually sits in the background of your thought.

Your worldview shapes and informs your experiences of the world around you.  Like a pair of spectacles with colored lenses, it affects what you see and how you see it. Depending on the “color” of the lenses, you see some things more easily, while other things are de-emphasized or distorted. In some cases, you don’t see things at all.

A Few Examples

Here are a few examples to illustrate how your worldview affects the way you see things. Suppose that one day a close friend tells you that she recently met with a spiritualist who put her in touch with a loved one who died ten years ago. Later that day, you read an article about a statue of the Virgin Mary that witnesses claim to have seen weeping blood. You also hear a news story on the radio about possible signs of complex organic life discovered on Mars. Your worldview—your background assumptions about God, the origin and nature of the universe, human beginnings, life after death, and so forth—strongly influences how you interpret these reports and react to them.

Worldviews also largely determine people’s opinions on matters of ethics and politics. What you think about abortion, euthanasia, same-sex relationships, public education, economic policy, foreign aid, the use of military force, environmentalism, animal rights, genetic enhancement, and almost any other major issue of the day depends on your underlying worldview more than anything else.

As you can see, then, worldviews play a central and defining role in our lives. They shape what we believe and what we’re willing to believe, how we interpret our experiences, how we behave in response to those experiences, and how we relate to others.

In the next two articles I’ll say more about the importance of worldviews and the benefits of thinking in terms of worldviews.


James N. Anderson (PhD, University of Edinburgh) is associate professor of theology and philosophy at Reformed Theological Seminary in Charlotte, and an ordained minister in the Associate Reformed Presbyterian Church. He is a member of the Society of Christian Philosophers, the British Society for the Philosophy of Religion, and the Evangelical Philosophical Society. He is the author of What’s Your Worldview?: An Interactive Approach to Life’s Big Questions (excerpt).

Online source of the above article.

3 responses to “What in the World Is a Worldview?

  1. I really enjoyed the book by Dr. Anderson and reviewed his new book earlier in this month on my blog. I think he’s definitely a very capable Christian apologists and one that will be more well known as he’s publishing more books.

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  2. I have to laugh at this!!  Why?  Here is a question posed as an example in the article:

    Suppose that one day a close friend tells you that she recently met with a spiritualist who put her in touch with a loved one who died ten years ago.

    My response: 

    What?  Are you kidding me?  Why do you, as a Christian, have a friend, a close friend by the way, that has no clue as to what the Bible states?  Why haven’t you, as a Christian preached the gospel to this so-called close friend, telling him LONG BEFORE he would even consider consulting a spiritualist?  What does the bible say in regards to necromancy (talking to the dead)?  

    No close friend of mine would seek a spiritualist to begin with.  If the person did, they would not be my close friend, nor would they be my friend.  They would just be someone who I knew.

    However…Jesus asked questions to people a lot…and why?

    Luke 10:26 He said unto him, What is written in the law? how readest thou?

    In a nutshell, opinions are formed BASED on something.  Here is what the Bible states:

    1. Matthew 12:3 But he said unto them, Have ye not read what David did, when he was an hungred, and they that were with him;Matthew 12:2-4 (in Context) Matthew 12 (Whole Chapter) Other Translations 2. Matthew 12:5 Or have ye not read in the law, how that on the sabbath days the priests in the temple profane the sabbath, and are blameless?Matthew 12:4-6 (in Context) Matthew 12 (Whole Chapter) Other Translations 3. Matthew 19:4 And he answered and said unto them, Have ye not read, that he which made them at the beginning made them male and female,Matthew 19:3-5 (in Context) Matthew 19 (Whole Chapter) Other Translations 4. Matthew 22:31 But as touching the resurrection of the dead, have ye not read that which was spoken unto you by God, saying,Matthew 22:30-32 (in Context) Matthew 22 (Whole Chapter) Other Translations 5. Mark 12:10 And have ye not read this scripture; The stone which the builders rejected is become the head of the corner:Mark 12:9-11 (in Context) Mark 12 (Whole Chapter) Other Translations 6. Mark 12:26 And as touching the dead, that they rise: have ye not read in the book of Moses, how in the bush God spake unto him, saying, I am the God of Abraham, and the God of Isaac, and the God of Jacob?Mark 12:25-27 (in Context) Mark 12 (Whole Chapter) Other Translations 7. Luke 6:3 And Jesus answering them said, Have ye not read so much as this, what David did, when himself was an hungred, and they which were with him;Luke 6:2-4 (in Context) Luke 6 (Whole Chapter) Other Translations Bottom line…HAVE YOU NOT READ…?  OUR opinions are BASED on the Bible.

    Jesus asks:

    Luke 10:26 King James Version (KJV) 26 He said unto him, What is written in the law? how readest thou? Bottom line: Our own bibles are what forms our opinions.  HOW DO YOU UNDERSTAND IT?  Or, HAVE YOU NOT READ IT(THE SUBJECT MATTER BEING DISCUSSED, WHATEVER IT MAY BE)?

    Ed Chapman

    ________________________________

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    • Ed, That is as it should be for forming a Christian worldview. We look at everything through the lens of scripture and response accordingly, whether be just forming an opinion about something, or responding to something specifically. That’s exactly what the author is saying with this:

      “Here are a few examples to illustrate how your worldview affects the way you see things. Suppose that one day a close friend tells you that she recently met with a spiritualist who put her in touch with a loved one who died ten years ago. Later that day, you read an article about a statue of the Virgin Mary that witnesses claim to have seen weeping blood. You also hear a news story on the radio about possible signs of complex organic life discovered on Mars. Your worldview—your background assumptions about God, the origin and nature of the universe, human beginnings, life after death, and so forth—strongly influences how you interpret these reports and react to them.”

      Why you had to laugh at it, and why you would question whether or not I understand the article or even read it, is frankly, beyond me. You agreed with the author!

      Like

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